Wednesday, February 14, 2007

HEARTS IN BONDAGE

...so last Fall i went to a costume shop with my kid, and was amazed at the Goth/slut-wear costumes that were available for both adults and children. the world had become safe for kinkiness - especially the commercial variety - and i thought this was a major enough social change that i ran a Goth-tume feature during the run-up to Halloween.

last week, i went into a CVS, and there was a seasonal Valentine's Day display...and amongst the candy hearts and mylar-balloons-on-a-stick were:



















well now, me thought...ain't they cute? i'm sure they were intended for a "cute couple" to show the world how they were locked together in a relationship. but on the other hand - B & D had become acceptable enough to make it into the mainstream...for only $1.99, too.

um...with the usual legal disclaimers, of course:








and this sober warning:









uh, yeah...doyathink? let's not take things TOO far, B's & G's.

NP: RC in SF sent this fun link: http://www.weird.tv/

PEEVE DE JOUR: major winter storm outside today. where are the sunny, 70 degree temperatures of yester year...you know, in December '06?

JOIE DE JOUR: returned from Gulf Coast, FLA yesterday afternoon, and was thinking while stuck in Pulaski Skyway traffic how this was the first trip down there where i didn't eat any grouper. not as crazedevengelical for this species of fish as so many are...so it was great to hear almost simultaneously on NPR that a DNA check of Tampa Bay area restaurants had revealed that most 'grouper' simply ain't...it's Asian catfish or some other foreign, farm-raised cheapo breed that the 'traunts pass off as legit. so by not imbibing, i opted out of the Great Fish Fraud of '07.

CSI: Phillipi Creek Seafood Shack?

N.B.A.T.W.P. (Never Be At The Wrong Party):

this is R. Stevie Moore's dad:

LEGENDARY BASSIST BOB MOORE TO BE SALUTED IN FEBRUARY AS NEXT NASHVILLE CAT AT THE COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME® AND MUSEUM

NASHVILLE, Tenn., January 24, 2007 – The Country Music Hall of Fame® and Museum’s quarterly program series Nashville Cats: A Celebration of Music City Session Players returns on Saturday, February 17, with a salute to legendary bassist Bob Moore. The 2:00 p.m. program, which will be held in the Museum’s Ford Theater, is included with Museum admission and is free to Museum members.

In a career spanning sixty years, Nashville native Bob Moore has played bass on over 17,000 recordings, making him one of the most recorded musicians in history. From the 1950s on, Moore contributed to a host of #1 country hits including Bobby Helms’ “Fraulein,” Marty Robbins’ “El Paso,” Roger Miller’s “King of the Road,” Loretta Lynn’s “Coal Miner’s Daughter” and Conway Twitty’s “Hello Darlin’.” Moore also played on classic recordings like Elvis Presley’s “It’s Now or Never” and Patsy Cline’s “Crazy.”

As a member of Nashville’s celebrated “A-Team,” his impeccable meter along with his subtle yet commanding style made Moore’s bass lines the foundation for a myriad of artists recording in Nashville for four decades. Moore’s studio credits span

Bob Loyce Moore was born November 30, 1932, in Nashville to humble beginnings. Barely out of diapers, he was drawn to the sounds of his grandmother’s phonograph and broadcasts of the Grand Ole Opry. By age 15 Moore had transitioned from shining shoes outside the Ryman Auditorium to playing bass onstage with country comedians and Opry regulars Jamup & Honey. Soon afterward, Moore landed a prestigious job playing bass for Paul Howard's Arkansas Cotton Pickers, which would help open the door for him to back the likes of Eddy Arnold, Jimmy Dickens, Flatt & Scruggs and Andy Griffith, among others.

By age 20 Moore was playing with Red Foley in Springfield, Missouri, and Marty Robbins in Nashville, Tennessee. Tired of commuting between the two cities, Moore returned in 1954 to Nashville where he became primarily a studio musician. As part of the “A-Team” of virtuosos, Moore helped usher in the lushly orchestrated Nashville Sound, which attracted top artists and producers to Music City.

He worked regularly on sessions with Elvis Presley and, in 1959, he was an early investor in Monument Records, where he served as Roy Orbison’s orchestra leader. Moore was also a sideman for Jerry Lee Lewis from 1983-1985.

Although widely known as a successful country session musician, Moore also performed at the Newport Jazz Festival and recorded with Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops, experimental rock guitarist Harvey Mandel and premier jazz guitarist Hank Garland, to name a few.

More information about the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum is available at http://www.countrymusichalloffame.com/site/ or by calling (615) 416-2001.

cb...where are you?






NEW JERSEY

2 Comments:

Anonymous JK said...

"Experimental" rock guitarist Harvey Mandel? Well, maybe experimental by Nashville standards.

Like Gram Parsons was an experimental interpreter of Buck Owens songs. :-)

11:12 PM  
Blogger CBeezwax said...

well...he did once climb down from Y'allympus and play with Canned Heat.

cb

7:59 AM  

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